Latest Two Commercials and Events!

Hemmings House Golf Team

I hope that all who celebrated Thanksgiving this weekend had a great one and were able to spend time with the people you love!

The last two weeks at Hemmings House has been very QUIET, Why? Because we are everywhere but the office! 

  • Mark just got back from Calgary filming bobsled athletes as they train for the upcoming Olympics...fast and furious! 
  • Lauchlan just finished cutting four of our latest TV commercials with our friends at Hudson to be released very soon!
  • Jen is in the tropics enjoying her honeymoon, congrats Jenny and David! 
  • Andrew just delivered the final episode of our MMA series, Cubicle to the Cage to our broadcaster radX…12 episodes of awesome! 
  • Steve and Greg just returned from a successful food & travel television shoot in Paris followed by a week of industry fun at MIPCOM in Cannes.

We have several events in October leading into November. Check out our new Events CalendarMake sure you check it today because we have events and screenings starting THIS WEEK!!!

Our distributors sold two of our TV projects this week (Wrestling With Reality and Melting Lands) and we continue to pitch and sell regional stories that are relevant to the world. 

As it is Thanksgiving weekend, I was thinking of how blessed we are to have such great supporters, customers and friends. Hemmings House has really grown into a bit of a culture of its own, a culture that attracts creative people, adventurous people, lovers of life and great story telling. I read a great blog post from Sociallogical’s Jeff Roach about being thankful to your supporters, it was perfectly fitting for my Thanksgiving weekend.

 

Featured Work at Hemmings House

Foursum

Foursum – Unlock Your Game from Hemmings House on Vimeo.

In the spirit of thanksgiving I want to send a million props to our friends at Foursum.com ! They connected with us to film their latest commercial spot.

The Foursum guys have recently developed an awesome golf app that features tens of thousands of courses world wide, you gotta check out what these guys are developing! I had the pleasure of directing this spot alongside Steve and Jen producing with the visual brilliance of Lauchlan behind the lens. 

 

JDI TV Spots 

We had a ball working with Revolution Strategy and JD Irving again for yet another three television commercial spots. We are really proud of how these turned out. We even brought our ole’ friend Warren Sonoda from Toronto via LA to direct the series of ads again. (On another note keep an eye out for the Trailer Park Boys latest project Swearnet, Warren recently finished directing that gem as well!). Take a look at the campaign and three commercials here -http://www.justaskjdi.com

 

 

Blast to the Past

Grave Concerns: Jack Kerouac from Hemmings House on Vimeo.

Hemmings House is celebrating a decade of doing business in Atlantic Canada. Every once in a while I like to reach back in the archives and watch films that we produced in our earlier years. As a huge Jack Kerouac fan, and as an even larger Brent Mason fan I particularly love this little half hour documentary we produced for CBC. If you haven’t seen this film yet, please do check it out, its alot of fun!

Instagram Workshops with Mark Hemmings

INTERMEDIATE INSTAGRAM WORKSHOP

TAUGHT BY INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHER MARK HEMMINGS 

INTERMEDIATE_INSTAGRAM

TUESDAY AUGUST 20TH, 7-9pm, 86 PRINCE WILLIAM STREET, 3F, SAINT JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA.

WHO IS IT FOR? PEOPLE WHO ALREADY SIGNED UP AND USE INSTAGRAM TO ANY DEGREE. IPHONE AND ANDROID FRIENDLY.

Welcome to the instagram workshop blog page! Join Mark and other creative fun people at our studio on Prince William Street to learn some cool techniques to take your instagrams to a higher level. Don't rely on Instagram filters! Use your own imagination and various apps to create unique images that your friends can't duplicate. And if you love photographing your pets or what you are currently eating, well . . . those images will look better too.

The price is only $30, as this is not meant to be a money maker. Mark just loves teaching and loves mobile photography! 

For Android users please purchase the following apps (check to see if they work on your phone):

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.advasoft.touchretouch&hl=en

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.thegrizzlylabs.geniusscan&hl=en

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.eyeappsllc.prohdr&hl=en

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.studio8apps.instasizenocrop

For iPhone users please purchase the following apps:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/touchretouch/id373311252?mt=8

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/genius-scan-pdf-scanner/id377672876?mt=8

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pro-hdr/id347104281?mt=8

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/squaready-instagram-layouter/id440279995?mt=8

 

SPACE IS LIMITED, CONTACT MARK TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT: mark@hemmingshouse.com  or 506-721-8284

 

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OLD AND NEW EXPRESSIONS

Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

This is a still image from a new film I am working on, using a similar stop-motion animation technique as my film entitled GEIST.
This time I am experimenting with using an old mid-20th century twin lens reflex camera made by Yashica.

Today’s blog entry is not a photography lesson, rather an encouragement to start photographing and thinking in very non-traditional ways. For photography as art, don’t worry about sharpness and technical accuracy; soul is far more important.

Use materials that have appeared in the past, and mix them with present day materials. With experimentation you should be able to come up with some very intriguing results! With a mind-numbing mass of good photographers around the world, you need to really provide the world with a solid and unique look. This may be the hardest part in any photography career. If you are at this stage, my encouragement is to read old photography magazines, and current fashion, lifestyle, art, and design magazines. A mixture of past, present, and future influences can only help in molding your own individual style.

Email this Blog to a friend!

Mark can be hired as a photographer or filmmaker via www.hemmingshouse.com

HIGH CONTRAST

Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

If you are using only natural window light and want to get a high contrast look for your portrait, black fabric will do the trick. The best material is black velvet, which seems to “soak up” the light, as velvet does not reflect any light back toward its source.

Simply hang or pin any type of black material as close to the subject as possible. Obviously you will not want the material to be in the photo, but just at the edge. If you want to see how much difference this technique makes, take two photos, one with, and one without the black material.

To increase the contrast even more, use high contrast film, or set your digital camera to its highest contrast setting. Keep in mind that extreme contrast portraits are usually best for fine art photography. If you are doing a portrait session for a normal paying client, it may be best to do it with a more traditional method.

Email this Blog to a friend! To see more photographs by Mark Hemmings, click here

DEPTH OF FIELD


Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

Low Depth of Field means that only a small “sliver” of the picture will be in focus, and the remaining parts of the picture space will be softly out-of-focus. This is very helpful for People photography, as long as the point of focus is always the subjects eyes.

There are two main ways to obtain low depth of field. Purchase a 50mm f1.8 lens, and set the lens to f1.8. Focus on the subject’s eyes, and everything else should go out of focus. The closer the camera is to the subject, the greater the effect.

If you currently only have a zoom lens that came with your camera, you can still get a good effect without buying a new lens. Set the zoom lens to the longest setting, such a 200mm, and the f-stop at its lowest number, such as f5.6. Similar to the 50mm lens, the closer the camera is to the subject, the greater the effect. You may need to use a tripod however when using such a long lens. The longer the focal length, the greater the chance of camera shake.

Email this Blog to a friend! To see more photographs by Mark Hemmings, click here

SCALE AND PERSPECTIVE

Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

Today’s blog entry is very short, but effective. When photographing large-scale scenes, whether they are natural or man made, it is important to include a reference point (such as humans) to give the viewer a sense of scale. As camera lenses do not give a 100% accurate representation of reality, it helps to either include background subject matter of a known scale, or additional foreground elements that the viewer can make spatial judgments from. In this case, the people in front of the falls show the scale of the waterfall.

I took this photo at Montmorency Falls, near Quebec City. Mark’s photographic prints for your wall can be purchased at www.markhemmings.com

Mark can be hired as a photographer or filmmaker via www.hemmingshouse.com

TELEPHOTO COMPRESSION


Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

If you are interested in learning how to take good sports photos, try using a zoom or telephoto lens at around 200mm. These long lenses have a tendency to “compress” an image, making depth of field changes more prominent, as well as giving the image much more drama. Another benefit to long lenses are the compositional possibilities; you can usually get rid of distracting background information because the subject usually fills the entire picture space.

The downside to long lenses are few, but keep these in mind:
1. You will need a tripod, as the longer the zoom, the shakier the images can become.
2. The longer the lens, the quicker the focusing will need to be. This is either the camera’s autofocus, or your own focusing.
3. You may need to increase the ISO to freeze the action of the moving subjects.
4. An f2.8 zoom lens is ideal for sports photography, but these are very expensive. A cheaper but high quality option is the 180mm or 200mm f2.8 telephoto lens (non zoom). You can buy them used for good prices, and the quality is excellent.

I took this photo at a bike race in Burlington, Vermont.

Mark’s photographic prints for your wall can be purchased at www.markhemmings.com
Mark can be hired as a photographer or filmmaker via www.hemmingshouse.com

NIGHT ILLUMINATION


Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

This is a photo of my first vehicle, a very enjoyable (and expensive to operate) Dodge camper van. I was out doing night photography a long time ago and decided to take a picture of the van, in case it ever died or was driven off a cliff in frustration. As it was a cloudless night, the moon provided all the light that I needed for my vehicular portrait. If you would like to see the world in a completely different way, set your camera up on a tripod (on a cloudless night), and do a long exposure photo of whatever subject you desire. Your exposure may be a few minutes, but the results are worth it. Even though moonlight is a similar color temperature as the sun, it is a very different quality of light, which will be evident in your final image.

If you are unsure of how to do a long exposure with your camera, click here for a previous blog post that dealt with star trail photography. Have fun!

Mark’s photographic prints for your wall can be purchased at www.markhemmings.com

Mark can be hired as a photographer or filmmaker via www.hemmingshouse.com

WIDE ANGLE LENSES


Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

If the above photo looks exaggerated in scale, it’s because I photographed the dandelion with a wide angle lens. The distortion caused by such lenses are usually unwanted; stretched, fat-looking faces, and an untruthful expansion of interior spaces are a few examples. However when it comes to nature photography, the exaggerated results from a wide angle lens shot close to the subject can result in very interesting images. Simply get as close to the subject as your focusing will allow, and you will find the lens distortion adds to the picture. It really helps (as in the above photo) if you subject “trails off” into the background, which creates a feeling of even more depth. Anything wider than a 35mm lens should do the trick!

Mark’s photographic prints for your wall can be purchased at www.markhemmings.com
Mark can be hired as a photographer or filmmaker via www.hemmingshouse.com

PHOTO BUSINESS CARDS

Dear reader, if this entry or my other blog entries don’t answer your specific photography questions, you can call me on the phone anytime for advice by clicking here.

Is your business card boring? Why not make a statement with your business cards by designing one with your own photography? The process is simple:

1. Take your preferred image and digitally re-size it to 2″x3.5″ @ 300 DPI
2. Add the appropriate text
3. Save the finished file as a TIFF or PSD file
4. Burn to disk and send to your local print shop

I have been doing this for years, and each print run I change the photo. Many people keep my business cards, as there is less incentive to throw out a business card when it is visually appealing.

This business card photo was taken in Grand Central Station in New York. I don’t know the person, but he was entering the Metrazure restaurant. If you are reading this blog, and that is your silhouette, thanks!

Mark’s photographic prints for your wall can be purchased at www.markhemmings.com

Mark can be hired as a photographer or filmmaker via www.hemmingshouse.com